Kokoro Dance

Barbara Bourget and Jay Hirabayashi

Barbara and Jay picture � Chris Randle

Barbara and Jay formed Kokoro Dance in 1986. They met in 1979 when both were dancing with the Paula Ross Dance Company. In 1982, Barbara and Jay joined with Peter Bingham, Ahmed Hassan, Lola MacLaughlin, Jennifer Mascall, and Peter Ryan to form EDAM (Experimental Dance and Music), a volatile collective of strong personalities that began with some very altruistic intentions, produced some highly original work, and eventually disintegrated into a number of separate companies (EDAM, Kokoro Dance, Lola Dance, and Mascall Dance).

Barbara Bourget

Barbara Bourget in "The Betrothal" � Jay Hirabayashi

Barbara Bourget was born in Port Alberni, B.C. Her father was a Québecois from the Gaspé region with Métis blood; her mother was born in England. Barbara started dancing at the age of five, studied ballet through her school years with Mara McBirney in Vancouver, and then won a scholarship to the Royal Winnipeg Ballet School where she gained her first exposure to world class dance performing in works by Agnes de Mille and José Ferran. From 1969 to 1972, Barbara performed with Les Grands Ballets Canadiens under the direction of Fernand Nault, John Butler, Pauline Koner, and Daniel Jackson. Barbara returned to Vancouver in 1974 and performed for five years with Mountain Dance before joining the Paula Ross Dance Company. She spent part of 1976 in New York studying Graham, Limon, and Cunningham techniques while pregnant. Her first son, Daniel James Haggart was born in 1977. In 1980 Barbara studied more Graham and Limon in Toronto returning there in 1981 to study Graham under Kazuko Hirabayashi. In 1981, Barbara also worked for Judith Marcuse in a piece called Playgrounds with Peggy Baker, Sacha Belinsky, Ronnie Gilbert, James Kudelka, and Larry Lillo. She also worked with Sacha and Sal Ferreras on Judith's original school show We Can Dance! In 1982, Barbara worked with Karen Jamieson on her seminal work Coming Out of Chaos. During this period, she also did a lot of freelance work with the Vancouver Opera. Between 1981 and 1986, Barbara choreographed twenty-five dances for EDAM, Kamloops Dance Umbrella, UBC Danceworks, Touchstone Theatre, and Québec Été Danse. Barbara has taught dance since 1975 for the Burnaby Arts Centre, Main Dance Place, Goh Ballet, Karen Jamieson Dance Company, Vancouver Moving Theatre, Simon Fraser University, Dancers' StudioWest (Calgary), Grant MacEwan College (Edmonton), University of Calgary, EDAM, Harbour Dance, and Kokoro Dance. From 1990 on, Barbara focused her attention on butoh studies with Minoru Hideshima, Kazuko and Koichi Tamano, Natsu Nakajima, Yumiko Yoshioka, Akira Kasai, Masahide Ohmori, Gustavo Collini-Sartor, Kinya "Zulu" Tsuruyama, and Diego Piñón.

Since forming Kokoro Dance, Barbara has choreographed over one hundred dance works. Her choreography, like her personality, is full of emotion. The emotion, however, is translated through disciplined technique. With a penchant for creating full evening works, Barbara Bourget's work challenges her dancers. With her restless spirit always exploring new territory, she also challenges her audiences. Butoh's focus on ma—the space between events—is a continuing investigation. Integration of feminist text into her work, through her collaborations with playwright Elizabeth Dancoes, has been a focus of research for more than fifteen years. Revisiting and refining older works is a necessary labour of love. During her career so far, Barbara has received sixteen Canada Council grants for choreographic and technical research. Barbara received a Master of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from Simon Fraser University in 2003. Her graduate studies focussed on the integration of dance and text. In 2009, Barbara was a recipient of The Dance Centre's Isadora Award for outstanding contribution in dance in British Columbia in teaching. For 2011 – 2012, The Dance Centre has named Barbara its senior artist in residency giving her access to studio and production space. During the residency, Barbara is mentoring five choreographers while they develop new solos.

Choreography by Barbara Bourget

1975
  • Trio for Three Women (Mountain Dance Theatre)
1977
  • Solo for Daniel (Mountain Dance Theatre)
1980
  • Grouse Mountain
  • Coraçao
1981
  • Quad
1982
  • Punchdrunk
  • Hawk Circling
  • Impending Death
  • Monkey Business
  • Teratornis
1983
  • Awkward Moment
  • Run Raw: Theme and Deviation (in collaboration with EDAM)
  • The Birds
1984
  • Four Women
  • Les Grenouilles (U.B.C. Danceworks)
  • Backstreet Affair, Zaz Turned Blue, Who Can It Be Now?
  • Paperwork (Québec été Danse)
  • Hitting the Wall
  • Tears
  • Platypuses
  • Quartet (Kamloops Dance Umbrella)
1985
  • The More They Remain The Same (with Lola MacLaughlin)
  • The Hopes of the Bald
  • Turbulent Tales (Simon Fraser University)
  • Going Down for the Count (Peter Eliot Weiss play for Touchstone Theatre, Jessie Award Nomination for best choreography)
1986
  • Bach to the Future (in collaboration with EDAM)
  • Meaningfull Glances
  • No Retreat, No Surrender
1987
  • Take Five (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Woman
  • Cocaine- The Board Game! (Tamahnous Theatre play directed by Kathleen Weiss)
  • Dis/0 to the Power
  • Herd (for Main Dance Place/Professional Training Intensive)
1988
  • Episode in Blue (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • 37
  • The Garden (for Main Dance Place/Professional Training Intensive)
  • Fog Rolls In On Little Cat's Feet
  • What'll I Do?
1989
  • Zero to the Power (80 minute new dance/new music Kokoro Dance production)
1990
  • Aeon (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Eos (for Main Dance Place/Professional Training Intensive)
  • Impending Death
  • Seven Dances for City on the Edge
1991
  • Impending Death
  • Sunyata (remounted Zero to the Power and Aeon plus Elysian Fields)
  • Bats - Part 1
  • Bats - Part 2
1992
  • Stacked (50 minute clown • butoh piece with Txi Whizz)
  • Bats - Part 3
  • Bats - Part 4
  • Bats (Premiere - 75 minute dance for six dancers and five jazz musicians)
  • Tomcat: Dangerous Desires (Feature film starring Richard Grieco, Natalie Radford, and Maryam d'Abo)
  • Fulcrum (60 minute solo with text by Elizabeth Dancoes)
1993
  • Big Fat Hen (60 minute solo with text by Elizabeth Dancoes)
  • Esse (60 minute dance for dancer/2 actors/1 musician with text by Elizabeth Dancoes)
1994
  • Ascension (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Dance of the Dead (85 minute dance for six dancers and four musicians)
  • Butoh for the Badlands (with Jay Hirabayashi for Formolo Dance with 17 dancers in Edmonton)
  • The Betrothal (42 minute solo to text by Elizabeth Dancoes)
1995
  • Wounded (11 minute solo)
  • Everything Happens to Me (11 minute solo for Ziyian Kwan to music by Dewey Redmond)
  • Encounters With The Goddess (with Jay Hirabayashi - 60 minute dance for three dancers to music by Robert J. Rosen performed live by Peggy Lee, cello and Adrienne Park, piano)
  • gushhh (12 minute trio for 3 ballet dancers, produced by Ballet British Columbia)
  • Sleep on It (with Jay Hirabayashi)
1996
  • Birdland (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Butoh for Robson Square (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Truths of the Blood (a new piece with text by Elizabeth Dancoes)
  • Sunyata, remount of the trilogy, originally created and produced in 1991
1997
  • Sade Part I (with Elizabeth Dancoes, playwright)
  • Bones with composition by John Korsrud for the 1997 du Maurier International Jazz Festival
  • Environmental works with Jay Hirabayashi performed at Wreck Beach, Powell Street Festival, Vancouver Folk Music Festival, Under the Volcano Festival, Stoltmann Eco • Fest
  • Popping the Quiff (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • The River with Jay Hirabayashi, work for eleven dancers
  • Moan (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
1998
  • Sade Part II (with Elizabeth Dancoes, playwright)
  • Embryotrophic Cavatina (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Environmental works with Jay Hirabayashi performed at Powell Street Festival, Vancouver Folk Music Festival, San Francisco Butoh Festival
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
1999
  • Sade Part III (with Elizabeth Dancoes, playwright and Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Embryotrophic Cavatina (with Jay Hirabayashi, revised work)
  • Verdant Stones (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Ex...it! '99 (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Environmental works with Jay Hirabayashi performed at Vancouver Folk Music Festival, Stanley Park, Round House, Rage Nightclub, Eastern Naturist Gathering, Massachusetts
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
2000
  • X-Roads (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Rite of Spring for 21 SFU students with music by Zoë McDougall
  • Quickening (solo for Michael Whitfield premiering at the Solos Festival)
  • Ex...it! '99 (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Environmental works with Jay Hirabayashi performed at Under the Volcano Festival, Stanley Park, Pacific Armoury, Trout Lake, Western Naturist Gathering in California
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
2001
  • Pleasure (50 minute work for six performers)
  • Crime Against Grace (forty-three minute work for ten dancers)
2002
  • When the Levy Breaks (for a Main Dance Bridging Program Student)
  • Master of Fine Arts Graduating Project, Juliette
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
2003
  • Sheepman Dreams (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • ( ) (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
2004
  • Solo (to music by Avro Part)
  • Solo (to music by Jeffrey Ryan)
  • Jesus Christ Superstar (for Kitsilano High School)
  • Walk This Way (for Main Dance Bridging Program Students)
  • Illicit
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
2005
  • Tutaj Tam / Here to There 70 minute work choreographed with Jay Hirabayashi and Jacek Luminski for Kokoro Dance and the Silesian Dance Theatre (Poland)
  • Skin / À Fleur de Peau 60 minute solo (inter-arts project with artist Lyse Lemieux and composer Marguerite Witvoet)
  • Guys and Dolls (for Kitsilano High School)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (70 minute work for 22 dancers with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Through and Through (17 minute solo for Carolyn Chan performed at Dancing on the Edge)
2006
  • Sunyata remount (2-1/2 hour work choreographed with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Anything Goes (for Kitsilano High School)
  • Falling Down (Trio for Simon Fraser and Mosaic performances)
  • Tabula Rasa (for Simon Fraser University)
2007
  • Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow - Collaboration with Vancouver Symphony (Daydream Mechanics to music by Michael Oesterle and Monday/Tuesday to music by Michael Torke)
  • Olver (for Kitsilano High School)
  • 34 dances for Queen Mary Elementary School
  • How Fortunate The Man With None - 10 minute solo for April Russell
  • Bellatrix (17 minute solo for Holly Holt)
  • Tabula Rasa (for AURA Dance Theatre of Lithuania)
2008
  • The Wiz (for Kitsilano High School)
  • Ghosts (for the Dancing on the Edge Festival, Powell Street Festival, and 20th Anniversary of Japanese Canadian Redress)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Mystic Beach/Malahat Farm Butoh
  • Running Through Glass (20 minute solo for Holly Bright)
  • ANU 6 (60 minute collaboration with Middle Eastern musicians)
2009
  • Two Night Stand (60 minute collaboration with Jay Hirabayashi, Tanya Tagaq, Cris Derksen, Tony Wilson, Lee Pui Ming, Dylan van der Schyff)
  • F (a work for 3 dancers, 3 actors, 3 musicians and video, performed at the Vancouver International Dance Festival)
  • Pagan Prayer
  • Tabula Rasa for Kokoro Dance
  • L.S.D. duet
  • South Pacific for Kitsilano High School
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
2010
  • L.S.D. sextet
  • The Drowsy Chaperone (for Kitsilano High School)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • Happiness (20 minute solo for Salomé Diaz)
2011
  • Music of Amber (19 minute sextet performed with the VSO)
  • I Sing The Body (42 minute septet performed with the VSO)
  • Sweeney Todd (for Kitsilano High School)
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi 70 minute work for 10 dancers)
  • Powell Street Festival Butoh with the SSRIs (30 minute duet with Jay Hirabayashi)
  • All Over the Map Butoh with the SSRIs (45 minute duet with Jay Hirabayashi)
2012
  • A Simple Way – Solo Work for myself in collaboration with Joseph Hirabayashi - Composer, Gerald King – Lighting Designer and Elizabeth Dancoes – Poet.
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi 70 minute work for 11 dancers)
  • Antennae solo for Jennifer McKinley
  • Crave – Choreographer – a film by Lisa Jackson
2013
  • Life – A work for 7 dancers choreographed with Jay Hirabayashi with Music by Lee Pui Ming, Set by Kai Chan, Lighting by Gerald King
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi 70 minute work for 14 dancers)
  • Crumbling solo for Matthew Romantini
  • This Butoh is Not Political – with Jay Hirabayashi and Neworld Theatre (Marcus Youssef and Dawn Petten).
2014
  • Butoh for Wreck Beach (with Jay Hirabayashi 70 minute work for 14 dancers)

Jay Hirabayashi

Jay Hirabayashi in "Ascension" � Laurence M. Svirchev

Jay Hirabayashi was born in Seattle, Washington. He left that city at the age of four to live for the next eight years in Beirut, Lebanon and Cairo Egypt. He went to junior and senior high school in Edmonton, Alberta. After graduating in 1964, he spent seven months hitch-hiking in Europe before attending the University of Washington as a French major. After flunking out of school in 1966, he became a ski bum in Aspen, Colorado for a few years where he spent his time washing dishes and working his way up the ski racing ladder. In 1969 he was the Inter-Mountain States Senior A Downhill Champion at Jackson Hole, Wyoming. He also got drafted that year. After racing one final season in Canada and the U.S. Jay decided to refuse to comply with the draft orders and lived underground in San Francisco for two years where he worked as a dishwasher, yacht harbour caretaker, and ski shop technician. He also began studying kundalini yoga at this time. In 1971, after six weeks in a yoga ashram in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Jay married Alix McCririck and returned to Edmonton to attend the University of Alberta. In 1972, their daughter, Bodhi Lisha was born. Jay graduated from U. of A. in 1973 with distinction receiving a B.A. in philosophy and religious studies and a Block A award for athletic achievement on the ski team. Moving to Vancouver in 1973, Jay started graduate studies at the University of British Columbia. He graduated in 1978 with an M.A. in Buddhist Studies. In 1977, an old ski injury deteriorated to the point of requiring the surgical removal of the medial meniscus in Jay's left knee. He began dance classes to rehabilitate his leg. His marriage to Alix disintegrated. In 1978, he was hired as a member of the Paula Ross Dance Company. He studied modern dance, ballet, and contact improvisation during this early period. In 1979, his second daughter Kai Tomiko was born to Heather Davis, a former dancer with Judy Jarvis (Toronto). In 1979, he began living with Barbara Bourget and her then two and a half year old son, Daniel. In 1980, he left Paula's company to work with the Evelyn Roth Moving Sculpture Company. Barbara and Jay performed with Evelyn at the 1980 Edinburgh Festival. In 1981, Jay studied Graham technique with Kazuko Hirabayashi in Toronto. Jay worked briefly with Mountain Dance after that. In 1982, while simultaneously co-founding EDAM, Jay worked with Karen Jamieson's first dance company. Jay and Barbara got married in 1982. In 1983, he again studied Graham and Limon styles in Toronto with a Canada Council grant. From 1982 to 1986, Jay choreographed fourteen dances but also found himself drawn to directing and administrating. He became EDAM's unofficial and then official Company Coordinator during that period taking charge of applying for grants and coordinating projects. In 1985 he directed EDAM/MADE, a four hour performance involving fifty artists (including Mel Wong) at the Western Front. In that year, he also made his first contact with Vancouver's Japanese Canadian artists working on a piece with Katari Taiko called Runaway Horses, inspired by the Yukio Mishima novel of the same name. In 1986, Barbara and Jay had a son named Joseph Kiyoshi Hirabayashi. In that year also, Kokoro Dance was born. In 1986, Jay received a Canada Council B grant to work on new choreography. He choreographed a work called Rage for fourteen taiko drummers, three dancers, a martial artist, and a stiltwalker. The work received standing ovations at the 1987 Asia Pacific Festival and the 1987 Canada Dance Festival. Rage has been revised nine times since then and been performed over two hundred times across Canada, in the U.S. and in Europe. In 1986, Jay was elected to the Board of Directors of The Dance Centre, Vancouver's umbrella service organization. In 1990, Jay directed a month long installation called City on the Edge in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery involving seventy participants. In 1993 and 1995, Jay was elected again to serve two year terms on the Board of Directors of The Dance Centre. In 1994, Jay won the Canada Council's Jacqueline Lemieux Prize (shared with co-winner Lola MacLaughlin) with a B grant to study in Japan with Kazuo Ohno, Yoshito Ohno, and Natsu Nakajima. Jay has had butoh studies with Goro Namerikawa, Minoru Hideshima, Koichi Tamano, Hiroko Tamano, Natsu Nakajima, Soga Kobayashi, Yumiko Yoshioka, Akira Kasai, Katsura Kan, Kinya "Zulu" Tsuruyama, Diego Piñón, Gustavo Collini-Sartor, Masahide Ohmori, Yukio Waguri, SU-EN, Tadashi Endo, Taketeru Kudo, and Akaji Maro. Currently, Jay does most of the administration for Kokoro Dance including funding applications, publicity, project coordination, graphic arts, publications, web site creation, and office management. He teaches butoh classes twice a week. Barbara is responsible for taking care of Kokoro's artistic direction and teaches four modern dance classes a week. Jay and Barbara also produce the annual Vancouver International Dance Festival that they started in 2000. Bodhi works as a stock broker's assistant and has long since moved out of the house. She married Mark Nariiwa in 2009 and they are now proud parents of Zachary Kiyoshi Nariiwa, born in May, 2012. Daniel graduated from UBC where he was a captain of the soccer team and is now a physical therapist at City Sports and Physiotherapy. Daniel married Chiquis Ponce de Leon in 2006. They have two children, Matthias James Haggart (born September 2008) and Amelia Marie Haggart (born August 2010) Kai is currently working in Toronto and was married in September, 2004 to André Ethier, a founding member of The Deadly Snakes. André is also a visual artist and solo recording artist. Kai and André have a son, Louis Joseph Hiroyuki Ethier (born in September, 2008) and a daughter, Frances Grace Ethier born in September, 2013. Joseph graduated from Kitsilano High School in 2004 where he was in the French Immersion Program and got his Bachelor of Applied Music from Vancouver Community College's Jazz Music program where his main focus is jazz piano. He also plays guitar, drums, bass, trumpet, sings, and writes songs. His former bands include Life Without Water, The SSRI's and The Aunts and Uncles. His current band is Sprïng. Joseph choreographed the scores for Barbara's A Simple Way in 2012 and Jay's Rock My Body . . . also in 2012.

Choreography by Jay Hirabayashi

Restless (1979)
A seven minute duet performed by myself and Barbara Bourget at the Paula Ross Studio to recorded music by Bohannon. The dance consisted entirely of floor movement, the dancers rising no higher than to the knees. Each dancer started at opposite sides of the stage performing a mirror image of the same solo that became fused at centre stage at the end of the dance.

Blind Fraternity (1982)
A ten minute duet performed in Vancouver, Saskatoon and Toronto in 1983 as well as on the 1985 EDAM National Tour and at EXPO 86. Utilizing partnering lifts derived from contact improvisation, the dance studies either two personalities or two aspects of one personality alternately at conflict or in symbiotic cooperation. Performed variously in silence, to live music by Ahmed Hassan and to live music by Tom Hajdu.

Alone in Angers (1983)
A seven minute solo originally choreographed on Barbara Bourget and performed by her in Vancouver and Calgary. To music by Carla Bley, the dance was built on the effort needed to maintain equilibrium and stay on one's feet when totally inebriated.

Rock Garden (1984)
A fifteen minute dance for 12 dancers to music by Ryiuchi Sakamoto performed by UBC Danceworks. The dance moved from isolated solitary movements to random group intermingling to duet with chorus to ensemble pattern choreography, all of this emulating some kind of societal formation process.

Runaway Horses (1984)
A 30 minute work using eight dancers and ten musicians performed at the Q.E. Playhouse in Vancouver. The dance was inspired by the Yukio Mishima novel of the same name and followed the fanaticism of a right wingish martial artist through events that lead to suicide. The dance was enhanced by the presence of the Katari Taiko drummers and master shakuhachi artist, Takeo Yamashiro, vocal percussionist Ahmed Hassan and North American champion martial artist, Keith Hirabayashi.

2+2+3 (1984)
A ten minute duet accompanied by two taiko drums and shakuhachi performed at the Q.E. Playhouse. A seated man with eight foot long pant legs performed ten minutes of variations on the sit up exercise while a woman with six foot kimono arms moved progressively towards him in repetitively building phrases of five counts. Music score by Shinobu Homma.

Improvisation (1984)
Developed with Peter Bingham and performed during Vancouver Dance Week, the dance used seventeen dancers in a fifteen minute work to recorded music by Glenn Branca (1st night) and Electronica Musica Viva (2nd night). The chorus was split into groups of three to five people who responded as an orchestra to movement directions given by Peter and myself. When all were moving to our satisfaction, we performed an improvisational duet in counterpoint.

The Dream (1984)
Originally a seven minute duet choreographed with Barbara Bourget and performed at Vancouver Dance Week, the dance was later performed as a twenty minute duet that developed through six nights of performance. In the original version, a little less than two minutes were left free for improvisational movement restricted to vocabulary already in the piece. In the later version, only the end was choreographed and the rest left to variations improvised from the original choreography.

Necropolis (1985)
To live music, originally, by the seven member new music improvisational ensemble, Five of Five, led by Tom Hajdu, this dance was of thirteen minutes duration with five dancers. The initial three minute section allowed improvisational movement restricted to a limited vocabulary. The remainder of the piece was choreographed with the exception of a two minute duet again improvised to specific vocabulary. The aim here was to allow a certain amount of spontaneous freedom without deviating from the overall aesthetic quality of the work (which in this case was rather dark).

Heavy Folds and Clumps That Wander (1985)
Choreographed with Jennifer Mascall for UBC Dance Horizons. A four person work using props of wood and heavy flannel that made angular environments that the dancers carried with them. A twenty five minute dance with original music by Don Macaully, the dance was choreographed in alternate sessions with each choreographer picking up or discarding what the previous session had accomplished and without discussion as to overall direction. It was observed by the choreographers that the result needed to be shortened by half or stretched by four (the action being either too slow or far too fast).

Dance, Stuff and Nonsense (1984/85)
Choreographed in sections by myself, Lola MacLaughlin and Barbara Bourget, this work was EDAM's program for elementary school children and was a series of short (average: three minutes) vignettes. My sections included: The Slugs - contact type rolls and floor work for three dancers; The Chickens - funk flavoured strutting for four dancers; Definitions - a trio of flipper finned dancers responding in different ways to spoken words; Lyric - a solo dancer and flute player in conversation with one another. All music composed and performed live by Robert Rosen. This work was performed over sixty times in B.C. schools as well as at EXPO 86. Music by Robert J. Rosen

EDAM/MADE (1985)
Artistic direction of a four hour performance involving 50 dancers, musicians, visual artists and poets including the EDAM company, Mel Wong, Gerry Gilbert and Tom Hajdu. The performances took place in the art gallery, studio, hallways, stairs, upstairs "Lux" and outside of the Western Front. Performances were overlapping and with most performed more than once in the evening.

Rage (1985/86)
Originally titled Half and Half and performed at the Powell Street Festival, the piece was retitled Rage for Vancouver Dance Week where it was performed at the Q.E. Playhouse and at the Firehall Theatre. Essentially, a struggle by a man to stand up against tension created by latex tubing restraint, the work stretches time through minimal movement. Additional tension is created by a musician who never sounds a note. At the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse, a flautist took ten minutes to get the flute to his mouth; at the Firehall, a taiko drummer took ten minutes to address his drum without hitting it.

Dr. Hack in the Bush's Tango (1986)
Inspired by Groucho Marx (a brilliant mover) in the film A Day At The Races and dedicated to all obstetricians who take the same approach to their profession as plumbers do to a sewer. A minute and twenty four second dance wearing nothing but a hospital gown and shower cap brandishing a toilet bowl brush.

Take Five (1987)
Choreographed with Barbara Bourget to an eleven minute version of Paul Desmond's famous tune of the same name. The dance has a choreographed beginning and end with space in the middle for two improvised solos.

Rage Part II (1987)
A 30 minute dance featuring a butoh style beginning with a nude dancer and shakuhachi followed by sections with nine dancers five of whom also perform on Japanese drums. The dance and drumming performed by Vancouver's Katari Taiko group.

Rage - Complete Version (1987)
A 60 minute multidisciplinary work with a cast of nineteen performers. Music by Robert J. Rosen, John Greenaway and Takeo Yamashiro; set by Duncan Wilson; costumes by Tsuneko Kokubo; martial arts by Keith Hirabayashi. The dance exposes a subconscious repression of emotion within a white painted butoh dancer through a series of surrealistic scenes depicting events during World War II when people of Japanese ancestry in B.C. were forced to leave the coast.

Flowers (1987)
A thirty minute work performed at the 1987 Powell Street Festival with nine dancers and three taiko percussionists and again at the Hornby Island Midsummer Festival with four dancers and one guitar/saxophone player (Paul Haggis). Essentially a structured improvisation with specific movement motifs that each dancer is required to explore for a set minimum of repetitions before moving to the next. The movements explore vibrational exhortations that develop in wave like fashion and emerge in a cathartic context when coupled with motivating mental pictures and impossible movement instructions (e.g., dancers are told to imagine a blinding white light that wipes out one's mind and to move without any muscles).

Stage of Fools (1987)
Two scenes from Shakespeare's King Lear performed by a Japanese actor/dancer with taiko accompaniment. The text is delivered in Japanese with the movement reflective in a primarily abstract and evocative fashion of the delivery of the words. The work is approximately forty three minutes in length and premiered at the Firehall Theatre.

Episode in Blue (1988)
An eighty minute multidisciplinary musical with music by Jeff Corness, choreography by Barbara Bourget and myself, video/film by Scott Haynes, direction from Andrew McIlroy and script/lyrics by myself. Dance in this work was used to support theatrical presentation rather than the other way around.

Rage (1988)
A version for young audiences for three dancers and three drummers incorporating slide projection, masks, taped text and movement of forty minutes duration. Over 100 performances will have been given by the end of the 1989/90 season.

Beans, Rice and Corn (1989)
A twenty minute collaboration with Snake in the Grass Moving Theatre members, Paul Garbanzo Gibbons and Gerardo Avila. A rap narrator in a strait jacket, a green alien in diapers and a butoh ballerina comments on pretentious dance and pretentious dance critics.

Aeon (1990)
A sixty minute collaboration with Barbara Bourget, Ross Barrett (saxophone, flute, synthesizers) and Uzume Taiko (John Greenaway, Eileen Kage and Leslie Komori) with Robert J. Rosen's music also on tape. Two butoh figures chart out a relationship in time, space and sound in a choreographic structure that allows room for original movement.

City on the Edge (1990)
Artistic directorship of a performance installation on the steps of the Vancouver Art Gallery that took place in the month of September with 70 musicians, dancers, actors, visual artists and poets produced by the Dance Centre.

Aeon (1990)
A twenty-two minute distillation of the previous version that was premiered at the INDE '90 Festival in Toronto. A collaboration with Barbara Bourget, the piece begins and ends on two wooden-slatted tables that are mic'd and processed. Score by Robert J. Rosen who also performs with Barbara and myself. The piece was also performed in Frankfurt, Germany and eventually became the second section of "nyat". Featured on the Adrienne Clarkson Presents program on CBC in December, 1991.

Canyon Shadows (1990-92)
A solo dance for Robert J. Rosen's outdoor environmental opera performed originally in a canyon outside of Canmore, Alberta and subsequently at the Sound Symposium '92 in Saint John's, Nfld. and at the Festival of Sound, Perry Sound, Ontario. A rock spirit character responds to the an environmental situation tempered by the sounds of two soprano voices, a percussionist and a tuba player.

Sunyata (1991)
This two and a half hour work was mostly choreographed by Barbara Bourget except for Aeon and solo sections that I performed. This work looked at three levels of reality from a Buddhist perspective but drawing its physical imagery from the etchings of Gustav Doré in his illustrations of Dante's Divine Comedy. This work had five performers with music performed by Robert J. Rosen and Adrienne Park.

Stony Plain and John Wayne (1991)
A ten minute solo covered in dried or drying red clay to music by Robert J. Rosen. This was a development of the last ten minutes of "nyat" but with the imagery drawn from recollections of a sweat lodge experience in Stony Plain, Alberta.

Rage (1992)
The seventh version of this piece, this time with reference to the American experience as well as the Canadian and changing the focus to a more personal retrospective using slides spanning a fifty year period of Canadian and American history. A new score by Robert J. Rosen and a different drumming sequence by Eileen Kage, Bonnie Soon and Leslie Komori. This piece was performed in Vancouver, New York, Montréal, Toronto and London, Ontario.

Rage (1992)
Version eight of this work with yet another drum score and a changed choreographic structure implementing more butoh vocabulary and incorporating the drummers into the group movement sections. Performed in San Antonio, Texas and Vancouver.

Ascension (1993)
Choreographed with Barbara Bourget for the Grand Hall of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull, Québec with a music score by Robert J. Rosen for the 70 voice Ottawa Central Choir, tabla and electronics; set by Susan Madsen and lighting by Gerald King. The Grand Hall is fifty feet high and three hundred and sixty-five feet in length.

Esse (1993)
Artistic directorship of 60 minute work choreographed by Barbara Bourget with text by Elizabeth Dancoes, set by Susan Madsen, music by Robert J. Rosen.

The Believer (1995)
Version nine of Rage reworked with three dancers and myself drumming to a new version of taiko by Uzume Taiko on tape.

Encounters With The Goddess (1995)
A sixty minute trio choreographed with Barbara Bourget incorporating Leslie Poole's paintings and Robert Rosen's music.

White Hot Core (1995)
A sixty minute work choreographed with Barbara Bourget for five dancers and the eighteen piece Hard Rubber Orchestra. Premiered at the 1995 du Maurier International Jazz Festival, Vancouver.

Birdland (1996)
A fifty minute work for eight dancers choreographed with Barbara Bourget performed in an alley in the downtown eastside of Vancouver that used the metaphor of birds to reflect the human demography of that part of town where lots of homeless people migrate.

Butoh for Robson Square (1996)
A sixty minute work choreographed with Barbara Bourget that used Brazilian Candomblé movement themes performed to conga drummers (Russell Shumsky's Linoleum Blownaparte) at the Robson Square steps and skating rink.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (1996)
A sixty minute work choreographed with Barbara Bourget performed in the nude at Wreck Beach using water, sand, and air as stage.

Sade Part I (1997)
A sixty minute work choreographed with Barbara Bourget initiating a trilogy of works on the Marquis de Sade's life and writings.

Sunyata (1997)
A re-mount of the 1991 version with eight dancers and four musicians.

Bones/Scorched Earth (1997)
Two thirty minute solos choreographed and performed with Barbara Bourget for the 1997 du Maurier International Jazz Festival Vancouver with scores by John Korsrud and Tony Wilson.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (1997)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget.

The River (1997)
Eighty minute work for twelve dancers choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Truths of the Blood (1997)
Twenty-five minute work choreographed with Barbara Bourget extracting the movement from Sade Part I. Performed for the Bagnolet Vancouver Platform.

Sade Part II (1998)
Sixty-eight minute work for two actors, two dancers and two musicians choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Moan (1998)
Thirteen minute duet choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (1998)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget.

Butoh for the Yerba Buena Gardens (1998)
Forty-five minute trio choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Embryotrophic Cavatina (1998)
Sixty-eight minute quartet choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Sade Part III (1999)
Sixty minute work for two actors, two dancers and a singer choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Embryotrophic Cavatina (1999)
Thirty minute revision of 1998 work for four dancers.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (1999)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget.

Ex... it! (1999)
Two hour collaborative creation with participants from Japan, Germany, The Netherlands, Belarus, Mexico, USA.

Verdant Stones (1999)
Thirty minute work for seventy performers choreographed with Barbara Bourget for the Vancouver Folk Music Festival (12 dancers, 6 stilt walkers, 10 jazz musicians, 10 pipers, 32 drummers).

X-Roads (2000) - Phase One
75 minute work for thirteen dancers choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2000)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget.

X-Roads (2000) - Phase Two
80 minute revision choreographed with Barbara Bourget with two musicians added to the thirteen dancers.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2001)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget.

Stillpoint (2001)
Duet choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Vesalii Icones (2002)
Forty minute solo to music by Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, performed by Standing Wave with video art by Jamie Griffiths.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2002)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for twelve dancers.

Sheepman Dreams (2003)
Fifty-eight minute work to music by Lee Pui Ming for six dancers and one artist choreographed with Barbara Bourget.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2003)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for eighteen dancers.

( ) (2003)
Seventy-one minute duet choreographed with Barbara Bourget to music by Sigur Ros.

Christian Zeal and Activity (2004)
Ten minute solo for Salomé Diaz to music by John Adams.

Butoh for Wreck Beach 2004)
Continuing development of the nude beach butoh work for eleven dancers.

Tutaj Tam / Here to There (2005)
Collaborative seventy-one minute work choreographed in three sections by Jay, Jacek Luminski, and Barbara Bourget respectively on twelve dancers from Kokoro Dance and the Silesian Dance Theatre (Poland).

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2005)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for twenty-two dancers.

Sunyata (2006)
Remounted with Barbara Bourget for eight dancers with new set and costumes.

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2006)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for twenty-three dancers.

Impregnator (2006)
Five minute structured improvisation for Bob's Lounge's Wanton Heat and Loose Desires at Scotiabank Dance Centre.

Bagpipe Butoh (2006)
Twenty minute duet with bagpiper Sylvia Detar for The Tomorrow Collective's Brief Encounters at the Anza Club.

Trans (2007)
Fifteen minute solo for Carolyn Chan to music by Sigur Ros. Performed at EDAM for the 2007 VIDF.

Idées fixes, reminiscences et résidus (2007)
Twelve minute work for five dancers set to music by Nicolas Gilbert. Performed at 2007 VIDF with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

In Memory (2007)
Fifteen minute work for five dancers to music by Joan Tower. Performed at 2007 VIDF with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

1907 (2007)
Thirty minute work with Barbara Bourget for six dancers, commissioned by and performed at the Powell Street Festival in Oppenheimer Park

Butoh for Wreck Beach (2007)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for nineteen dancers.

Bagpipe Butoh (2008)
Twenty minute duet with bagpiper Sylvia Detar for VIDF-08

Ghosts (2008)
Forty-seven minute work for 12 dancers, 3 bagpipers and a drummer, choreographed with Barbara Bourget

Wreck Beach Butoh (2008)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for nineteen dancers.

Mystic Beach/Malahat Farm Butoh (2008)
Seventy minute work for Victoria Dance workshop with Barbara Bourget for 8 performers

Babbitt (2009)
Twenty-four minute duet with dancer Holly Holt for 2009 VIDF performances with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

Wreck Beach Butoh (2009)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for sixteen dancers.

Wreck Beach Butoh (2010)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for thirteen dancers.

Essence (2011)
Ten minute solo to music by Michael Hynes premiered at the 2011 VIDF with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

Wreck Beach Butoh (2011)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for ten dancers.

Rock My Body . . . (2012)
Thirty minute solo to music by The Aunts and Uncles - premiered at the 2012 VIDF with The Aunts and Uncles

Wreck Beach Butoh (2012)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for ten dancers.

Conversations with Jan, Gordon, and Esther (2013)
13 minute solo + 30 minute improvisation with Stefan Smulovitz

Wreck Beach Butoh (2013)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for fourteen dancers.

This Butoh Is Not Political (2013)
Forty minute work created with Barbara Bourget, Marcus Youssef, and Dawn Petten with music by Zak Youssef and friends.

Come Back My Spirit (2014)
8 minute duet choreographed with Michelle Olson for a video by Loretta Todd

Wreck Beach Butoh (2014)
Seventy minute development of nude beach butoh work with Barbara Bourget for fourteen dancers.

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